Bachelor Weekend Cooking: The Shooter’s Sandwich

Cameron and Logan went to Denver to visit with friends this weekend, leaving me home alone.

Grocery Store Mobile

I’m told that Logan has spent his time playing in the snow. Snow is something of a novelty in Las Vegas, and on those rare occaisions he’s encountered it in his short life, he seems to have enjoyed it.

Playing in the snow

Mostly he just seems to enjoy eating it.

Snow Slide

Instead of fighting off comically bungling burglars with an array of increasingly complex Rube Goldberg machines assembled from common household objects, I have elected to spend my time cleaning, playing video games, and watching reruns of Babylon 5. Also, cooking extraordinarily manly food. The kind of food that enriches a man’s spirit and despite being delicious and satisfying, is the kind of thing that wife’s tend to roll their eyes at.

The Shooter’s Sandwich first came to my attention sometime in the late 90s by way of an episode of Two Fat Ladies. If you’re familiar with the show, then you likely know that what follows is unlikely to be considered diet food. If you’re not familiar with the show, you could probably deduce the same from the title which accurately described the two hosts. Fun Two Fat Lady fact; the surviving member of the pair’s full name is Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson Wright, and prior to spending time homeless and as an alcoholic, was the youngest woman called to the Bar as a barrister in the United Kingdom.

According to the history I’ve heard, the Shooter’s Sandwich was despised in Britian as a hearty meal that could be easily transported and serve as a meal, or two, for a hunting party. The sandwich is, at it’s most simple level, meat and a sauced mix of vegetables, crammed into an entire loaf of bread and then smashed for hours under a heavy weight and wrapped in layers of paper. You can use any meat that can be safely prepared raw, but as I understand it beef is traditional.

Ingredients

A loaf of bread
4-7 oz of butter
2 yummy steaks
Mushrooms
Garlic
Shallots
Stone ground mustard
Prepared Horseradish
Tarragon
Bourbon
Worcestershire sauce
salt and pepper

Start with a crusty loaf of bread approximately the same size as the cuts of meat you’ll be using. You want a strong bread, because we’re going to be abusing it. I’ve selected a large sourdough boule. Lop off the top of the loaf and scoop out most of the interior. Hooray! You’ve made a bread bowl. Save those crumbs if you want, we won’t be using them. Set your steaks out to warm up on the counter, and give them a good sprinkling of salt. I’m using rib eye steak because it’s the most flavorful of all the beef bits.

Prep the loaf

Time for your miss en place. That’s a fancy French culinary term for getting your shit together. It helps. Mince up the shallots, and garlic, and roughly chop the mushrooms. I’m using about 6 cloves of garlic, 4 large shallots, 6 mini portabellas and 6 of whatever variety of generic white mushroom every grocery store seems to have on hand. There’s also 2 teaspoons of tarragon, 2 tablespoons of Worcestershire, 1/3 cup of bourbon and an Armscor 1911 chambered in .45 ACP. The pistol isn’t strictly necessary I guess.

Mise en place

Melt the butter in a medium hot skillet and toss in the shallots and mushrooms. Don’t add any seasoning yet. Cook the veggies until the volume is reduced considerably and most of the liquid is cooked off, stirring frequently. About 10 minutes. Toss in the garlic and Worcestershire sauce, and continue to cook until the liquid is mostly cooked off. Deglaze the pan with the bourbon, being careful not to set yourself or your kitchen on fire. The traditional alcohol to use here is cognac, but I’m not French and I drink bourbon. Continue to cook until most of the bourbon is cooked off. Take the pan off the heat, stir in the tarragon and give it salt and pepper to taste.

Soften the veggies

Get a skittle, preferably cast iron, hot. Don’t screw around, you want that thing as screaming hot and dangerous as a junior varsity cheerleader. If you don’t have a cast iron skillet, you can use an aluminum or stainless pan, as long as it isn’t a non stick pan. Get a nonstick pan this hot and it released toxic fumes. No, really. If you don’t have an appropriate skillet, cook it on the grill. If you don’t an appropriate skillet or a grill, stop reading this article and go reflect on the errors you’ve made in your life.

Get pan smoking hot

Give your steaks a light rub of olive oil, you won’t need a lot. Slap the steaks in the pan, and don’t touch them. We’re going for a high heat sear and we want the steaks to be rare. If you’re uncomfortable with that, I suggest you stop being such a whiner. If you’re the kind of person to get squeamish about a rare steak, this sandwich may be too much for you. The more the beef is cooked, the less it will compress in the sandwich and more tough it will be when you eat it. About 90-120 seconds on a side should be enough. If you have an exhaust fan, now would be a good time to turn it on.

Sear steaks

Look at that rich brown crust on those steaks. Now, this is important. Using all your will power, DO NOT eat those steaks. Also, don’t let them cool or rest. You want them oozing juicy goodness into the sandwich.

Begin prep

Cram the first steak into your bread bowl. There’s no cause to be gentle. Treat it like the guy who dinged your car door at the grocery store.

Pack in the first steak

Layer in the veggie mixture. Hopefully you worked fast enough and it’s still hot. At this point, the bread bowl is probably going to be looking a little full. That’s okay. We’re going to smoosh it all down later. That being said however, don’t feel like you’re compelled to use all of the veggies.

Pack in the veggies

Now jack in that other steak. It might take some work. Don’t be afraid to show it the back of your hand.

Slap on the second steak

Smother the top of the steak with a thick layer of prepared horseradish. Slather the inside of the top of the loaf with mustard. Lay it on thick, like a Saturday morning lie.

Spread em

Place the top back on the loaf. Try to match it up so it’s even. See? It all fit.

Replace cap.

Wrap the load up in several layers of waxed paper and then bundle it up with butcher’s twine. Tie it up tight, you want the pressure contained as evenly as possible.

Wrap

Put some heavy weights on top of the sandwich. I’m using a cast iron dutch oven filled with half a dozen cans of refried beans. That’s about 16lbs. Heavier is probably better. Books also make good weights. I would advice against using anything filled with water, as the balance may shift and spill water everywhere.

Weigh it down.

Now comes the really hard part. Wait at least six hours. At least six hours, but you can press it for longer if you desire. It doesn’t need to be refrigerated, it’s still cooking. When I cut into this one after six hours, it was still warm.

Slice and enjoy

Once you’re done pressing the sandwich, cut through the entire bundle, string and paper and everything, and slice the sandwiches into wedges. Revel in the delicious aromas that fill your head. Luxuriate in the earthy sweet flavor of mushrooms and beef. Don’t forget to chew. Chewing is important. I recommend serving this delicious monster with beer, and for god’s sake, don’t try and eat it by yourself in a single seating. Remember, it is an entire loaf of bread stuffed with two steaks and a giant handful of vegetables and fungus.

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